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CORRESPONDENCE, PROCEEDINGS, &c. NOVEMBER, 1776.

its interests by every means of which I am capable notwithstanding I find myself necessitated, on many accounts to decline the honour intended me by this appointment. The offices I hold in this town, together with my own private concerns, engross so great a portion of my time and attention as to be incompatible with the duties of that station. Therefore pray your Honours will dispense with my acceptance of an office which it is not in my power to execute.

I am, very respectfully, your Honours' most obedient, humble servant,

HENRY BROWNFIELD.

To the honourable Council and House for the State of Massachusetts-Bay.


VAN BIBBER AND HARRISON TO ROBERT TOWNSHEND, HOOE, & CO.

St. Eustatia, 5th November, 1776.

GENTLEMEN : Enclosed you have invoice and bill of loading for one hundred and sixty half-barrels gunpowder—quantityfifty-three hundred pounds—on the proper account and risk of the State of Maryland.

Our Mr. Harrison is despatching Captain Conway from Martinique, with a very valuable cargo. I hope she has sailed, or about sailing, at this time.

We have just made a large purchase here of some woollens, muskets, and gun-flints, which we shall ship in the first of the Council's vessels that may arrive here.

We cautioned you and the Council some time past against sending your vessels to this island, thinking it the most dangerous and difficult to get into ; which we are since sorry for, as it has proved, less here than to any other island ; and for the future advise you to send all your vessels here, for sundry reasons, viz : this is always the best market for our produce, particularly tobacco, which is now rising fast. All our purchases are made here, and freight paid to Marlinico, for all the goods shipped from there, and most of the cargoes is sent from Martinique here to be sold, and very high freight paid on them ; that on the whole this is the best place by far, and grows less difficult to transact here, as the Dutch have discovered that their laws when put in force must ruin their merchants. I am on the best terms with his Excellency the Governour, and have his word and promise relative to some particulars that give me great satisfaction, and puts much in our powers. I was not so happy some time ago, and very bad consequences to apprehend, on our new Govenour's taking the command, but we are as well fixed with him now as we were with the former.

We are very largely indebted here on account of the State. Many sums now due, and many lately contracted, that will of course be due shortly. We are doing all in our power to serve our country, and hope they will not let our credit suffer.

We are, gentlemen, your most obedient, and very humble servants,

VAN BIBBER & HARRISON.

To Messrs. Robert Townshend, Hooe, & Co.


B. JOHNSON TO MARYLAND COUNCIL OF SAFETY.

Frederick-Town, November 5th, 1776.

GENTLEMEN : Captain James Mackall requested of me to inform you, the gentleman who was commissioned as First Lieutenant in his company is dead, that his Second Lieutenant has resigned, being a non-associator, and the men disapproving him. We therefore pray you will issue a commission to William Macke, as First Lieutenant, Joseph Hill, Second Lieutenant, and John Thomas, Ensign, and transmit them to me by some safe hand.

I am, gentlemen, your obedient servant,

B. JOHNSON.

To the honourable Council of Safety of Maryland, Annapolis.


JESSE HOLLINGSWORTH TO MARYLAND COUNCIL OF SAFETY.

Baltimore, November 5th, 1776.

SIRS : The bearer, John Gibbons, has been in Baltimore this two years, and has behaved himself sober and well as far as I have beard, and is an industrious young man ; is willing to take charge of the schooner Friendship, and I believe him fit for the task. He waits on you to know if it is agreeable, and for your further orders.

Please let me know by his return, how many barrels of beef I must have salted for you, and the particulars of the cargo you would have put on board the Friendship.

The Resolution has her flour on board, and her bread is ready. I shall put twenty hogsheads of tobacco, three hundred and fifty barrels of flour, and fill up with bread, on board the Resolution ; and twenty hogsheads tobacco, and one-third bread, and two-thirds flour, for the Friendship, as by your former orders. If I receive no other, shall obey orders witli Captain Martin.

From your humble servant,

JESSE HOLLINGSWORTH.

To the honourable Council of Safety, Annapolis.

P. S. The carpenters are not done with any of the vessels yet. I put the twenty hogsheads of tobacco on board the Ninety-Two this morning.


BENJAMIN NICHOLSON TO MARYLAND COUNCIL OF SAFETY.

November 5, 1776.

SIR : Mrs. Chamier has requested me to inquire from your Board whether 'tis practicable for her to get to her husband in New-York, and what steps she can take to accomplish her desire, and give satisfaction and security to her native country. All her relations are on our side, and many of them in the Army.

I am yours, &c,                          BENJ. NICHOLSON.

To Daniel of St. Thomas Jenifer, Esq., President of the Council of Safety, Annapolis.


GEORGE WELLS TO MARYLAND COUNCIL OF SAFETY.

Baltimore, November 5th, 1776.

GENTLEMEN : Captain Martin has been speaking to me about lengthening the brig Friendship, which I think I can do. Captain Martin will acquaint you with the time, &c. If you'll agree to have the brig done, I'd be obliged to you to send me per Captain Martin, 400.

Please to let me know by the return of the Captain, how the row-galley is to be masted, as I can't provide the spars until I have your orders.

I am, gentlemen, with great respect, your most humble servent

GEORGE WELLS.

To the honourable the Council of Safety for the Province of Maryland, Annapolis.


CAPTAIN DEAMS TO MARYLAND COUNCIL OF SAFETY.

Baltimore, 5th November, 1776.

GENTLEMEN : It is impossible for me to inlist a company of men, without you would first let me have the bounty money ; therefore, I should be much obliged unto you if you would send me word at what time it would be suitable for me to come and receive it, so that I may not be disappointed.

My men that I have discharged, that I owe the ration money unto, think that I have cheated them out of it ; therefore I should take it as a great favour if you would send me a line from under your own hands, to let them know to the contrary of it.

I should be glad you would send me word what I am to do with the men that I have inlisted since the others were discharged : whether 1 am to get them inspected directly, and put them into barracks, or how they are to be victualled. I likewise should be glad you would send me word what the non-commissioned officers and private soldiers are allowed per month. And in so doing, you will much oblige, yours to serve,

FREDERICK DEAMS.

To the honourable Council of Safety, Annapolis.


PRESIDENT OF CONGRESS TO GENERAL WASHINGTON.

Philadelphia, November 5th, 1776.

SIR : The Congress, apprehensive that Commissioners from some of the States for the purpose of appointing officers in the Army under the new establishment, may not have arrived at the camp, and at the same time fully and deeply impressed with the necessity of recruiting the Army to its full complement, have passed the enclosed resolves, author-

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